Watergate scandal

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Background

"Plumbers" unit

DNC headquarters bugging

Cover-up and exposure

Nixon resignation

Motive for break-ins

CIA involvement

Removing Nixon

Votescam theory

DC prostitutes

Pedophile book

Perpetrators

Organizers

Burglars

  • James McCord
  • ...

See also

References

External links

  • Secret Agenda by Jim Hougan (1984)
  • Dirty Tricks: Nixon, Watergate, and the CIA by Shane O'Sullivan (2018)

CIA involvement

Votescam allegations

  • Copy of the first 13 chapters of Votescam by Jim Collier and Ken Collier
  • Nixon investigating Katharine Graham's TV station in Miami
    • Poynter, "A Rememberance of Courage", 2002/08/20: "The piece that I might add to the story is the perspective of a lawyer who worked with a large team to resist hostile challenges to the licenses of the two television stations owned by the Washington Post in Florida -- WPLG in Miami and WJXT in Jacksonville.

      The Federal Communications Commission reviewed all the television licenses in a given state at a single time. Applications for Florida were up for review beginning in early 1973 just after Richard Nixon had been reelected in a landslide victory despite the early revelations about Watergate. Many of these reports came from the Washington Post's investigation.

      [...]

      In 1973, there were some 30 television stations in Florida and only two were challenged. These two, WJXT in Jacksonville and WPLG in Miami, were both owned by Post-Newsweek and the story of these challenges is worth repeating."
    • Politico, "Nixon's newspaper war", 2014/08/08: "The Post’s publisher during Watergate, Katharine Graham, faced a lot of pressure from the Nixon administration and wrote about the threats to the Post’s TV licenses in her biography.

      “Of all the threats to the company during Watergate — the attempts to undermine our credibility, the petty slights, and the favoring of the competition — the most effective were the challenges to the licenses of our two Florida television stations,” she wrote. “No doubt there was a mixture of motives among the challengers — the perception of blood in the water, easy pickings, and understandable thinking that the atmosphere was right given the Nixon-dominated FCC.”"
  • Back in 1995, freelance journalist Wendell Woodman anticipated that "Deep Throat" was Mark Felt, drawing on the Votescam story

Washington DC prostitutes

Other interpretations